11
Tue, May

covid-19vaccine

  • In all, we are expecting some seven hundred and fifty thousand (750,000) persons, comprising five hundred and thirty-two thousand (532,000) JHS 3 students, and two hundred and eighteen thousand (218,000) teaching and non-teaching staff, and invigilators, to be involved in tomorrow’s exercise.

    Fellow Ghanaians, good evening, and thank you for having me in your homes, once again. Two weeks ago, we begun the reopening of our schools, as part of the phased approach to bring our nation back to normalcy, following the outbreak of the novel COVID-19 disease in our country. Since that time, final year University students, SHS 3 and SHS 2 Gold Track students have all returned to school.

  • We are the first country in the world to be recipients of vaccines from the COVAX Facility, and I want to express my appreciation to members of the COVID-19 Taskforce, which I chair, and to officials of the Ministry of Health and the Ghana Health Service for this commendable feat.

    Fellow Ghanaians,

    Good evening, and thank you for welcoming me into your homes once again. You are doing so on one of the sacred days of our nation, 28th February, when the 1948 Christiansborg Crossroads shooting occurred seventy-three (73) years ago, which led to the martyrdoms of Sergeant Adjetey, Corporal Attipoe, and Private Odartey Lamptey, martyrdoms that ignited the nationalist movement, and led us to the freedom we enjoy today. Let us observe a moment’s silence in honour of their memory, and the memory of all the faithful departed patriots who helped create our nation. May their souls rest in perfect peace.

  • "I want to make it very short, that, It is not true that Ghana will have 3 million people infected before we reach the peak, we would never see that," Dr Nsiah Asare said.

    The Presidential Advisor on Health, Dr Anthony Nsiah-Asare, says his comments on projections on the number of likely Coronavirus (Covid-19) infections in Ghana made during a television interview were taken out of context.

  • “Saliva testing could potentially make it even easier for people to take coronavirus tests at home, without having to use swabs,” said Health Secretary Matt Hancock.

    A weekly coronavirus testing regime using a “no-swab” saliva test is being trialled in Southampton, southern England, and could result in a simpler and quicker way to detect outbreaks of the virus, the British government said on Monday.

  • The Serum Institute is producing the vaccine developed by Oxford University and Astra Zeneca under the local brand name COVISHIELD and will distribute it to India, its neighboring countries and other low and middle income countries.

    India has begun exporting Covid-19 vaccines to neighboring countries with the first batches being shipped Wednesday to Bhutan, Maldives, Bangladesh, Nepal, Myanmar and Seychelles, the foreign ministry said.

  • “Spending and borrowing trillions of dollars from the Chinese among others is not necessarily the best thing we can do to get our economy to be strong long term,” Romney added.

    One of President Joe Biden’s top economic aides on Sunday will press Democratic and Republican senators for a fresh $1.9 trillion in coronavirus relief to help struggling Americans and avert a larger economic crisis.

  • “Relieved,” proclaimed critical care nurse Sandra Lindsay after becoming one of the first to be inoculated at Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New York. “I feel like healing is coming.”

    Health care workers around the country rolled up their sleeves for the first COVID-19 shots Monday as hope that an all-out vaccination effort can defeat the coronavirus smacked up against the heartbreaking reality of 300,000 U.S. deaths.

  • Amid reports of severe shortage of oxygen supplies and critical medicines such as the anti-viral drug Remdesivir, Modi on Saturday asked authorities to pull out all the stops to ramp up production of COVID-19 vaccines and asked his teams to work closely with local governments.

    India’s capital New Delhi recorded 25,500 coronavirus cases in a 24-hour period, with about one in three people tested returning a positive result, its chief minister said, urging the federal government to provide more hospital beds to tackle the crisis.

  • The evidence is mounting, that the burden is growing. And we have no capacity to cope as a country if this trend does not peak and subside. This virus has resurged and is rampaging, ....

    Last Monday I was on my way to work in the morning.  I left home, on a journey that usually takes 30 minutes through the Accra Traffic.  It took me 3 hours. I did not really understand why until I got on campus, and realised that it was because the students had come back, and we were sharing the same entrance.  No preparation had been made for the large numbers of people who would flood the place.  Everyone was using the single entrance, and single exit.  The security men milled around listlessly, trying to shepherd lost drivers unto choked roads.  It was mayhem.  And in all this, no one had thought about the fact that there was a quarternary medical centre on the University Campus, and that its staff would need access on such a day. 

  • While Nadia, the first tiger to have been reported sick was tested under anesthesia, the other cats were tested by using a fecal sample test developed by the zoo’s laboratory partners that did not require the animals be placed under anesthesia.

     Eight big cats at the Bronx Zoo have been discovered to have tested positive for COVID-19.

  • What good gift is there to give our current crop of health students than a health system furnished with these three ideas – Strategy, Capacity building and Constant Information Upgrade.

    Written By Edith Zikpi - If we had the chance to decide if we wanted COVID -19 at all, we – as a country – would have unanimously chose to be unrepresented in that discussion.

  • Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, there has been an acceptance that the only way to end it and return society to some sense of normalcy was going to be through the discovery of viable vaccines.

    Robert Sears in “The Vaccine Book: Making the Right Decision for Your Child” states “most anti-vaccine books claim that all shots are bad, the diseases aren’t really anything to fear, and as long as you live a natural and healthy lifestyle, you don’t have to worry. I think this is a very irresponsible approach to the vaccine issue. Vaccines are beneficial in ridding our population of both serious and nonserious diseases.”

  • Adesina underlined the stark disparities between vaccine acquisitions by several rich countries that have acquired sufficient vaccines to inoculate their populations twice over, and African countries, that remain primarily dependent ...

    African Development Bank (www.AfDB.org) President Dr. Akinwumi Adesina has called for vaccine justice for Africa. Speaking at the launch of the Bank’s African Economic Outlook 2021 report on Friday, Adesina decried the lack of Covid-19 vaccines reaching Africa.

  • “Until all doubts are dispelled and experts guarantee that it holds no risk for people, we are stopping immunization using that vaccine,” Bulgarian Prime Minister Boyko Borissov told a Cabinet meeting.

    Officials in several European countries pushed back Friday against decisions by others to pause use of AstraZeneca’s coronavirus vaccine following sporadic reports of blood clots, despite a lack of evidence the shot was responsible.

  • He noted that it seems the coronavirus has come to stay and until a cure is found, it has to be lived with.

    The General Overseer of the Action Chapel International Ministry, Archbishop Nicholas Duncan-Williams, has called for prayers to apprehend the vicious corononavisus to prevent it from spreading in an exclusive interview with Paul Adom-Otchere on Metro TV's Good Evening Ghana programme.

  • Our last check indicates that most of the vaccine stock that can be manufactured, should emergency use authorization be secured between now and June 2021, have been secured by just 15 countries.

    Randy Pausch, in The Last Lecture states, “another way to be prepared is to think negatively. Yes, I’m a great optimist. but, when trying to make a decision, I often think of the worst-case scenario. I call it ‘the eaten by wolves’ factor.’ If I do something, what’s the most terrible thing that could happen? Would I be eaten by wolves? One thing that makes it possible to be an optimist, is if you have a contingency plan for when all hell breaks loose. There are a lot of things I don’t worry about because I have a plan in place if they do.”

  • "No, I want people to have a certain freedom, and I don't believe in that, no," Trump told Fox News' Chris Wallace when asked if he would consider a national mask mandate.

    President Donald Trump on Monday tweeted a photo of himself wearing a mask, saying, "many people say that it is Patriotic to wear a face mask when you can't socially distance" and "There is nobody more Patriotic than me, your favorite President."

  • "In the meantime, AstraZeneca and Oxford University have started on modifications to the vaccine for the South African variant and we expect it will be ready by the end of the year, should it be needed," Walters told the Kurier.

    A modified version of AstraZeneca's (AZN.L) COVID-19 vaccine tailored to combat a coronavirus variant first documented in South Africa could be ready by the end of 2021, an AstraZeneca official in Austria said in an interview published on Sunday.

  • African researchers meeting this week must devise ways the continent’s economy can do even better than before the coronavirus pandemic hit

    Since the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a global pandemic in March 2020, countries, societies, and individuals have struggled to respond to the pandemic’s devastation of health systems, economies, trade, and human wellbeing. While Africa has been spared the pandemic’s harshest health impacts, it has absorbed a heavy economic burden.

  • The directive, according to the President, was based on data, which suggests that the surge in cases was as a result of non-adherence to preventive protocols at such social gatherings.

    The Minister-designate for Information, Mr Kojo Oppong-Nkrumah, has explained that the new restrictions on social gatherings as announced by President Akufo-Addo last Sunday, does not mean a ban on marriages.

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