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george floyd

  • Floyd’s death on May 25 has become the latest flashpoint for rage over police brutality against African Americans, propelling the issue of race to the top of the political agenda ahead of the U.S. presidential election on Nov. 3.

    Hundreds of mourners in Minneapolis on Thursday remembered George Floyd, the black man whose death in police custody set off a wave of nationwide protests that reached the doors of the White House and ignited a debate about race and justice.

  • “The mistakes that are happening are not mistakes. They’re repeated violent terrorist offenses and people need to stop killing black people,” Brooklyn protester Meryl Makielski said.

    Another night of unrest in every corner of the country left charred and shattered landscapes in dozens of American cities Sunday as years of festering frustrations over the mistreatment of African Americans at the hands of police boiled over in expressions of rage met with tear gas and rubber bullets.

  • Chauvin's trial is now underway. This week, a judge reinstated a third-degree murder charge. Chauvin, 44, also has been charged with second-degree unintentional murder and second-degree manslaughter. He has pleaded not guilty to the charges.

    A $27 million settlement to the family of George Floyd has been unanimously approved by Minneapolis' City Council.

  • Alexander Kueng posted a $750,000 bond and was released late Friday afternoon, ...

    A second former police officer charged after the death of George Floyd has been released on bond.

  • The other indictment, against Chauvin only, alleges he deprived the 14-year-old boy, who is Black, of his right to be free of unreasonable force when he held the teen by the throat, hit him in the head with a flashlight and held his knee on the boy’s neck and upper back while he was prone, handcuffed and not resisting.

    A federal grand jury has indicted the four former Minneapolis police officers involved in George Floyd’s arrest and death, accusing them of willfully violating the Black man’s constitutional rights as he was restrained face-down on the pavement and gasping for air.

  • "Being black in America should not be a death sentence," Minneapolis Mayor Jacob Frey said at a news conference Tuesday morning. "For five minutes, we watched a white officer press his knee into a black man’s neck. Five minutes. When you hear someone calling for help, you’re supposed to help. This officer failed in the most basic, human sense."

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation will probe the death of a black man who died shortly after being apprehended by police in Minneapolis, Minnesota, after disturbing video emerged on social media showing a police officer with his knee on the man's neck as the man repeatedly yells out, "I can't breathe."

  • As the glass shatters, an officer uses a Taser on Young and officers pull him from the car as officers shout, “Get your hand out of your pockets,” and, “He got a gun. He got a gun. He got a gun.” Once he’s out of the car and on the ground, officers zip tie Young’s hands behind his back and lead him away.

    Six Atlanta police officers were charged Tuesday after dramatic video showed authorities pulling two young people from a car and shooting them with stun guns while they were stuck in traffic caused by protests over George Floyd’s death.

  • Tou Thao, J. Alexander Kueng and Thomas Lane, all of whom were fired and arrested days after Floyd died last May, face charges at a trial on Aug. 23 that they aided and abetted second-degree murder and second-degree manslaughter of Floyd.

    With the conviction of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin in the death of George Floyd on Tuesday, prosecutors will begin turning their attention to making their case against three others who took part in the fatal arrest.

  • As he called for unity, Mattis even drew a comparison to the U.S. war against Nazi Germany, saying U.S. troops were reminded before the Normandy invasion: “The Nazi slogan for destroying us ... was ‘Divide and Conquer.’ Our American answer is ‘In Union there is Strength.’”

    After long refusing to explicitly criticize a sitting president, former Defense Secretary Jim Mattis accused President Donald Trump on Wednesday of trying to divide America and roundly denounced a militarization of the U.S. response to civil unrest.

  • The move comes just hours after a man, identified as Rayshard Brooks, was shot and killed by police at a Wendy's drive-thru after police said he pointed a Taser at an officer while running away from law enforcement.

    Atlanta Police Chief Erika Shields has resigned, according to city Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms.

  • None of the three men who appeared in court spoke. Dressed in orange jumpsuits, they appeared separately in back-to-back hearings lasting about five minutes each.

    A judge set bail of $1 million on Thursday for three former Minneapolis police officers charged with aiding and abetting in the murder of George Floyd, a black man whose killing in police custody set off widespread protests.

  • The presumptive Democratic presidential nominee has built his campaign around a promise to heal “the soul of the nation” and is suddenly getting his chance to try in real time.

    Joe Biden said Friday that the “open wound” of systemic racism was behind the police killing of a handcuffed black man in Minnesota. Biden also accused President Donald Trump, without mentioning him by name, of inciting violence with a tweet that warned that protesters could be shot.

  • Then one of the young men asked me the question which sounded more like an accusation: “But you are not really black, are you?”

    It is 1991 and I am in Bloemfontein, capital of the Free State province of South Africa.

  • “This isn’t just a wink to white supremacists — he’s throwing them a welcome home party,” Harris, a leading contender to be Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden’s running mate, tweeted of Trump’s rally plans.

    Black community and political leaders called on President Donald Trump to at least change the Juneteenth date for a rally kicking off his return to public campaigning, saying Thursday that plans for a rally on the day that marks the end of slavery in America come as a “slap in the face.”

  • The mayor of a Southern California city has resigned over an email that stated he didn’t “believe there’s ever been a good person of color killed by a police officer” locally

    The mayor of a Southern California city resigned following an email in which he stated he didn’t “believe there’s ever been a good person of color killed by a police officer" locally.

  • Judge Peter Cahill went beyond the 12 1/2-year sentence prescribed under state guidelines, citing Chauvin’s “abuse of a position of trust and authority and also the particular cruelty” shown to Floyd.

    Former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin was sentenced to 22 1/2 years in prison for the murder of George Floyd, whose dying gasps under Chauvin’s knee led to the biggest outcry against racial injustice in the U.S. in generations.

  • His face was obscured by a COVID-19 mask, and little reaction could be seen beyond his eyes darting around the courtroom. His bail was immediately revoked and he was led away with his hands cuffed behind his back. Sentencing will be in two months; the most serious charge carries up to 40 years in prison.

    Former Minneapolis Officer Derek Chauvin was convicted Tuesday of murder and manslaughter for pinning George Floyd to the pavement with his knee on the Black man’s neck in a case that touched off worldwide protests, violence and a furious reexamination of racism and policing in the U.S.

  • On Wednesday, Nelson filed a new document further arguing for a new trial and change of venue, claiming that "cumulative errors, abuses of discretion, prosecutorial and jury misconduct deprived Derek Chauvin of a fair trial."

    Derek Chauvin's attorney is seeking a sentence of time served for the former officer who was convicted in April of murdering George Floyd, court records filed Wednesday show.

  • Barr's account contradicts Trump's insistence that he was the one who made the decision to go to the bunker "for an inspection," claiming it was a routine visit like ones he'd made before.

    Attorney General William Barr has directly contradicted President Donald Trump's claim that he went to a White House bunker for an "inspection" last Friday night during large protests outside.

  • It is even more confusing when this happens in a country with touted credentials as the world’s leading exponent of democracy, emphasising human rights.

    Written By Brig Gen Dan Frimpong (Rtd) - The yell “bunker” by an instructor during our field tactical training in the coldness of winter sent us poor cadets scurrying into the nearest trench, or bunker if there was one immediately available. “Bunker” was the signal for a simulated incoming nuclear strike, and therefore the command to take cover!

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