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FILE - A doctor uses a smartphone to take a photo of a child with facial deformity before surgery at the Vietnam Cuba hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam.

Health

Chief WHO scientist Soumya Swaminathan said increased availability and use of digital technology offers new opportunities to improve people's health.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has issued its first guidelines on digital health intervention.

A preserved pig brain. Using brains from animals killed for food, researchers have now restored some cellular functions in pig brains hours after death, potentially offering a new avenue for studying and treating brain diseases and disorders.

Health

In a feat sure to fire up ethical and philosophical debate, a new system has restored circulation and oxygen flow to a dead mammal brain.

Scientists have restored cellular function in 32 pig brains that had been dead for hours, opening up a new avenue in treating brain disease—and shaking our definition of brain death to its core. Announced on Wednesday in the journal Nature, researchers at the Yale University School of Medicine devised a system roughly analogous to a dialysis machine, called BrainEx, that restores circulation and oxygen flow to a dead brain.

A selection of donuts, bagels, rolls, croissants, turnovers and sticky buns are displayed in a New York coffee cart, April 10, 2012. File image

Health

The United Nations estimates that nearly 1 billion people worldwide are malnourished, while nearly 2 billion are "overnourished."

One in five deaths globally is linked to poor diet, experts said in a study released Thursday, warning that overconsumption of sugar, salt and meat was killing millions of people every year.

A Congolese health worker administers Ebola vaccine to a boy who had contact with an Ebola sufferer in the village of Mangina, in North Kivu province of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Aug. 18, 2018. File image

Health

In a study published Tuesday in the journal Cell Reports, the scientists said the approach could be used for Ebola and other newly emerging deadly diseases caused by viruses.

Scientists working on developing vaccines against Ebola have found they can "harvest" antibodies from volunteers vaccinated in research trials and use them to make treatments for the deadly viral infection.

Lab Test Appears To Diagnose Fibromyalgia for the First Time

Health

About 75 percent of those who suffer from fibromyalgia are undiagnosed. Some people live with pain for years. Many patients receive treatment that's ineffective or even harmful.

Millions of people live with the constant pain of fibromyalgia. It's a disorder that's often misdiagnosed. And while lab tests can help identify a lot of diseases, until recently there was no test for fibromyalgia. Now, a simple blood test could finally give these patients scientific proof of their condition.

Biogen scraps Alzheimer drug trials, wiping $17 billion off its market value

Health

Investors believe the successful development of a treatment for Alzheimer’s, which affects about 5.7 million Americans, will result in multi-billion dollar annual sales. Still-experimental treatments have had a dismal track record, with more than 100 failures.

Biogen and partner Eisai Co Ltd are ending two late-stage trials for the experimental Alzheimer’s drug aducanumab, in a setback to efforts to find treatments for the disease and for Biogen’s stock, which lost more than $17 billion of its value on Thursday.

Shown March 4, 2019, in Seattle, Timothy Brown is the first person to be cured of HIV infection, more than a decade ago. Researchers now say a second patient has lived 18 months after stopping HIV treatment without sign of the virus following a stem-cell transplant.

Health

Doctors found a donor with a gene mutation that confers natural resistance to HIV. About 1 percent of people descended from northern Europeans have inherited the mutation from both parents and are immune to most HIV.

A London man appears to be free of the AIDS virus after a stem cell transplant, the second success including the "Berlin patient," doctors reported.

U.N. agencies warn listening to loud music is unsafe and can cause permanent damage to hearing.

Health

U.N. health experts say they do not want to deprive younger people of the enjoyable experience of listening to music regularly on their headphones. But they warn listening to loud music is unsafe and can cause permanent damage to hearing.

U.N. agencies warn that more than 1 billion people ages 12 to 35 risk losing their hearing from listening to loud music on their audio devices. The World Health Organization, and the International Telecommunication Union, are launching new international standards to make smartphones and other devices safer for listening.

FILE - A Sierra Leonean nurse and doctor stand by a patient in a Lassa fever ward at Kenema Government Hospital in southeastern Sierra Leone, Feb. 7, 2011.

Health

West Africa is in the midst of a seasonal outbreak, which usually flares between December and March. The disease is endemic in the region so, the current outbreak was expected. But, ...

The World Health Organization reports it is scaling up efforts to try to control an outbreak of Lassa fever, which is escalating at a rapid pace.

Study: Opioid Prescriptions for Pets Surge, Mirroring Human Crisis

Health

"However, the risk to humans is that leftover opioid prescriptions to animals end up in the same medicine cabinets as leftover opioids for people, leading to opportunities for misuse by teenagers or unintentional exposures in children that can be lethal," Perrone said by email.

Many more Americans may be getting opioids for their pets, and veterinarians appear to be prescribing increasingly potent versions of these drugs to animals, a small study suggests.

Joie Henney cuddles up with Wally, a 4-foot-long emotional support alligator. Image credit - news wires

Health

Wally was rescued from outside Orlando at 14 months old. Henney says Wally eats chicken wings and shares an indoor plastic pond ...

A Pennsylvania man says his emotional support alligator helps him deal with his depression.

In Ghana, Novartis is working with local private medicinal shops to make blood pressure screening more convenient and to dispense medicines from within the community. Image credit - walweed alzuhair/flicker

Health

In 2018, the Index reports that four of these companies are implementing or expanding commercial models in Africa that serve people on very low incomes

The new Access to Medicine Index notes increasing interest from multinational pharmaceutical companies in doing business in Africa that benefits people on lower incomes. However, the 2018 Index also finds important gaps in where pharmaceutical companies are registering new products on the African continent.

FILE - A replica of the International Prototype Kilogram is pictured at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures, in Sevres, near Paris, Oct. 17, 2018.

Health

The redefinition of the kilogram, the globally approved unit of mass, was the mostly hotly anticipated change. For more than a century, ...

In a historic vote, nations on Friday unanimously approved a groundbreaking overhaul to the international system of measurements that underpins global trade and other vital human endeavors, uniting behind new scientific definitions for the kilogram and other units in a way that they have failed to do on so many other issues.

FILE - A street vendor sells illegal and false drugs in a street of Adjame in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, Oct. 13, 2018.

Health

"Counterfeiters prey on poorer countries more than their richer counterparts, with up to 30 times greater penetration of fakes in the supply chain," said the report.

When Moustapha Dieng came down with stomach pains one day last month he did the sensible thing and went to a doctor in his hometown of Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso's capital.

New US Exercise Guidelines: Move More, Sit Less, Start Younger

Health

Only 20 percent of Americans get enough exercise now, and the childhood obesity problem has prompted the push to aim younger to prevent poor health later in life.

Move more, sit less and get kids active as young as age 3, say new U.S. federal guidelines that stress that any amount and any type of exercise helps health.

US Regulators Approve Powerful New Opioid Pill Despite Criticism

Health

The new drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Friday is five to 10 times more potent than pharmaceutical fentanyl and ...

U.S. regulators have approved a powerful new opioid tablet to be used in hospitals over objections from critics who fear the pill will be abused.

Dr. Fatima Cody Stanford. Image credit - The Indianapolis Star

Health

Dr. Fatima Cody Stanford says she was on a flight home to Boston from Indianapolis when she said she noticed a woman next to her was hyperventilating.

A physician says she was subject to racial discrimination by two flight attendants on Tuesday as she tried to help a sick fellow passenger on a Delta Air Lines flight.

Not exercising worse for your health than smoking, diabetes and heart disease, study reveals

Health

Jaber said researchers must now convey the risks to the general population that "being unfit should be considered as strong of a risk factor as hypertension, diabetes and smoking -- if not stronger than all of them."

We've all heard exercise helps you live longer. But a new study goes one step further, finding that a sedentary lifestyle is worse for your health than smoking, diabetes and heart disease.

FILE - A newborn, one of 12 babies born by C-section, cries inside an incubator at the Bunda Hospital in Jakarta, Indonesia, Dec. 12, 2012. Several hospitals in Indonesia's main cities performed more cesareans than usual with new mothers hoping a 12-12-12 birth date will bring luck to their newborns. VOA image

Health

They said millions of women each year may be putting themselves and their babies at unnecessary risk by undergoing C-sections at rates “that have virtually nothing to do with evidence-based medicine.”

Worldwide cesarean section use has nearly doubled in two decades and has reached “epidemic” proportions in some countries, doctors warned Friday, highlighting a huge gap in childbirth care between rich and poor mothers.

FILE - Packages of flavored liquids for e-cigarettes are seen displayed at a smoke shop in New York City, New York, U.S., May 1, 2018.

Health

In what it called the "largest coordinated enforcement effort in FDA history," the agency issued written warnings and fines to 1,300 retailers for their role in selling the devices to children.

American teens' use of electronic cigarettes has hit "epidemic proportions," the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said in a statement released Wednesday.

A worker removes expired food in a local supermarket in Brussels on Jan. 16, 2017. The European Court of Auditors chided the European Union's executive branch in a report, "Combating Food Waste," that decries the bloc's lack of effort in reducing the food waste, estimating the EU wastes 88 million tons of food per year.

Health

Around a third of the world's food is lost or thrown away each year. Currently, we waste 1.6 billion tons of food annually, worth about $1.2 trillion.

Food waste could rise by almost a third by 2030 when more than 2 billion tons will be binned, researchers said on Tuesday, warning of a "staggering" crisis propelled by a booming world population and changing habits in developing nations.

FILE - School girls light candles in the shape of a ribbon during a HIV/AIDS awareness campaign ahead of World Aids Day, in Ahmedabad, India, Nov. 30, 2016.

Health

The report said while there was significant progress in the battle against AIDS in other age groups, it is notably lacking among adolescents.

One girl between the ages of 15 and 19 is infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS, every three minutes of every day, a United Nations report found.

Drinking palm wine poses health risk

Health

The heart surgeon said the use of pesticide in preserving food items, including ‘Koobi’ and tiger nuts, were rife and called for national intervention.

The Minister of Science, Technology, Environment and Innovation, Prof. Kwabena Frimpong Boateng, has cautioned those who drink palm wine of a possible health risk because most tappers use pesticide to process the drink.

FILE - A doctor holds Truvada pills at her office in San Francisco, May 10, 2012. New research shows more promise for using AIDS treatment drugs, such as Truvada, as a prevention tool, to help keep uninfected people from catching HIV during sex with a partner who has the virus.

Health

There were no infections among gay men who used a two-drug combo pill either daily or just before and after sex with someone with HIV, one study found. In a second study,..

New research shows more promise for using AIDS treatment drugs as a prevention tool, to help keep uninfected people from catching HIV during sex with a partner who has the virus.

HIV vaccine shows promise in human trial

Health

More testing is now needed to determine if the immune response produced can prevent HIV infection in people.

An HIV vaccine that has the potential to protect people around the world from the virus has shown promising results.

Although screening is not routinely recommended it is wise for anyone who plans to get involved in strenuous exercise to get clearance from a physician by history, physical exam and ECG.

Why would a healthy fit person collapse during exercise and die suddenly? In such a person there is usually an underlying heart condition. So, strenuous exercise would overburden the ailing heart, and they are more likely to suffer a heart attack or cardiac arrest. The two most common causes of sudden death during exercise are coronary artery disease and cardiomyopathy.

Overweight? Depressed? It May Be Your Microbes

Health

Obesity triggers changes in metabolism — for example, making liver, muscle, fat and other tissues less responsive to insulin. Left untreated, these changes can lead to diabetes.

Microbes may be helping stir up anxiety and depression in obese people, if results from a new mouse study hold true in humans.

First bone marrow transplant takes off in Ghana

Health

History has been made as the Greater Accra Regional Hospital (Ridge Hospital) has admitted its first patient to undergo the first-ever bone marrow transplant procedure in Ghana at the Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) centre at the facility.

New Guidelines: Start Colorectal Cancer Screening Earlier

Health

The American Cancer Society is recommending people start testing for colon and rectal cancer at age 45, rather than 50 as currently prescribed.

FDA approves new drug that prevents migraines without side effects

Health

The drug's maker, Amgen, said U.S. list price is for the once monthly self-injection treatment will be $575 per month or $6,900 annually.

The Food and Drug Administration approved a new migraine drug on Thursday.

File image - WHO prepares for worst in response to DR Congo Ebola outbreak

Health

Heavily criticised for its response to the 2014-16 Ebola epidemic, the WHO is now on the front line in dealing with the emergence of new cases in DR Congo. It says that it is preparing for the “worst case scenario”.

WHO: Cholera Vaccination Campaign Starts in Yemen

Health

The disease is spread by feces in sewage contaminating water or food, and it can kill because patients quickly lose fluids through vomiting and diarrhea. Caught early it can be treated with oral rehydration salts.

 The first vaccine campaign against cholera in Yemen has started, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Monday, a year and a half after an epidemic was triggered by war and a health and sanitation crisis.

File image - One hemisphere of a healthy brain (L) is pictured next to one hemisphere of a brain of a person suffering from Alzheimer disease.

Health

Regardless of what tests are used to make the diagnosis, the new definition will have a startling effect: Many more people will be considered to have Alzheimer's, because the biological signs can show up 15 to 20 years before symptoms do.

Government and other scientists are proposing a new way to define Alzheimer's disease basing it on biological signs, such as brain changes, rather than memory loss and other symptoms of dementia that are used today.

WHO: Breastfeeding Should Be Standard Care for All Babies. Image credit - ebonycom

Health

Technical Officer in WHOs Department of Nutrition for Health and Development, Laurence Grummer-Strawn, says the updated 10-step guidance advises health facilities on how care should be offered to new mothers and babies.

The World Health Organization (WHO) says breastfeeding all babies for the first two years would save the lives of more than 820,000 children under the age of five every year. The WHO is issuing a new 10-step guide aimed at promoting breastfeeding in health facilities around the world.

Watch the moment technology opened this blind man’s eyes to the world around him

Health

William Weeks lost most of his sight after suffering a rare illness at age five.

Antibiotic resistance occurs when bacteria develop the ability to defeat the drugs designed to kill them and can make infections harder to treat.

Most people prescribed antibiotics for sinus infections are on treatment courses of 10 days or longer even though infectious-disease doctors recommend five to seven days for uncomplicated cases, a U.S. study suggests.

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