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African migrants being displayed under the 'For Sale' sign in Libya. Getty image

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The business of comedy "No laughing matter" - KSM

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Celebrating geniuses only for politicians to starve them

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Should homosexuality be legalised in Ghana?

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The author, Kobina Ansah.

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Free SHS: Is Napo a lone Wolf in the jungle?

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When Ghana's Best Universities Rank Poorly

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On Dilution

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President Akufo-Addo's interview on Al Jazeera and the question of legalizing homosexuality in Ghana

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Ghana’s Second Lady, Samira Bawumia, engages with a member of the popular soap show ‘KumKum Bhagya’ during a recent visit to India.

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I am a taxpayer. Are you?

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From Mahama pads to a vindicated birthday present - a cry for principled politics - Samuel Okudzeto Ablakwa

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Africa1 Media statement on why Samini was unable to perform at S-Concert 2017

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PRESS STATEMENT FROM KATANGA ALUMNI ON THE BRUTALISATION OF KNUST STUDENTS BY ASOKWA POLICE. YouTube screengrab of image courtesy of ghanacrusader

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PRESS RELEASE: OCCUPYGHANA DEMANDS OUTLINE FOR PASSAGE OF THE RIGHT TO INFORMATION BILL. Image credit - gvtjob

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Joyce Mogtari Releases Statement on John Mahama’s Meeting With NDC Regional Chairpersons

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OCCUPYGHANA STATEMENT ON THE REPORTED DEFILEMENT OF A MINOR AT ASSIN ADADIENTEM AND MATTERS ARISING

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Press Statement: George Ayisi-Boateng Apologizes For Comments

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Ghana Police Will Ensure Justice In Assin Fosu Defilement Case

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OCCUPYGHANA CONDEMNS THE MISHANDLING OF THE DELTA FORCE CASE AND THE FARCICAL SENTENCES IMPOSED

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Nzema Youth Association Congratulates Hon. Ernest Kwofie

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OCCUPYGHANA CALLS FOR NEW RULES ON LPG DISPENSING STATIONS AND TRUCKS

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Press release: Ghana FA lodges FIFA protests over referee in World Cup qualifier in Uganda

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Launching of Restoration of Nurse And Midwife Trainees Allowance

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Dr. Raphael Nyarkotey Obu: From Dodowa to changing the face of Men’s health and Alternative medicine practice

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The author, Prof Kwabena Frimpong-Boateng

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Ghana football: The life of a local based player (3)

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Ghana football: The life of a local based player (2)

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Abel Manomey (1st left) celebrates a goal with Gt. Olympics teammates. File image courtesy of Images_image.

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Pension scheme for cocoa farmers to ensure sustainable cocoa production

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Revaluation of properties - What to expect!

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Planting for Food and Jobs, Fall Armyworm invasion and achievement of SDG Two - GNA photo

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In defence of Prof Naana Jane Opoku - Mrs Joyce Bawa Mogtari

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The Rapid Response team of the Ghana Police force responding to a chaotic scene during the recent installation of the new Ga Mantse. Photo - News wires

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Governor of the Bank of Ghana, Dr. Abdul-Nashiru Issahaku

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Late Togolese President, Gnassingbé Eyadéma

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Kwesi Appiah’s confidence must translate into results

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Vigilante Groups In Politics – Rule of Law Must Prevail

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Pra River (Photo: K. Amigosten Amoah)

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Rejoinder: Manasseh’s Love Letter to Ebony

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Manasseh's Folder: A love letter to Ebony

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Of glaring bias and ill-treatment of Ghanaian nurses by some

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Homosexuality in Ghana

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Open letter to President Akufo-Addo on the MIDA Project

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YOUR ‘DISTIN’ SILENCE ON THE RAPE OF FOUR YEAR OLD GIRL IS BAD. Photo credit - myjoyonline

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An Open Letter To Vokacom While Things Are Still Hot

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Minister of Finance - Ken Ofori-Atta

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A WEEK OF A-PLUS AND PEPPER DEM MINISTRIES – Facebook photo

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OPEN LETTER TO ACEP ON BACKING THE SALE OF VRA THERMAL PLANTS

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An Open Letter to Vice President Dr Bawumia

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Proposal to monitor broken down vehicles on our highways with drones - Photo - 3news

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Meet Farida Nabourema, Togo - Photo courtesy of Farida Nabourema.

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Full interview: President Akufo-Addo talks about Africa, political instability, homosexuality in Ghana, and more with Jane Dutton

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Kofi Amoah Amigosten

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Marricke K. Gane

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NCCE’s guidelines on how to fight corruption. Photo credit - penplushbytes

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Homosexuality- An Affront To Human Dignity

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The menace of child defilement in Ghana

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The launch of the national sanitation campaign and the way forward

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NEWS COMMENTARY ON THE NEED TO TAME POLITICAL PARTY FOOT SOLDIERS

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The Atomic Junction Gas Explosion

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Harvesting potential, the need to cast a wider net

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Kenya Plastic Bag Ban And Lessons For Ghana

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FALLOUT FROM GHANA'S VICTORY FOLLOWING ITLOS RULING ON MARITIME BOUNDARY DISPUTE

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Synchronising National Development Efforts To Ensure Long Term Sustainability

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Implementation of the Free Senior High School Policy

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President Akufo-Addo delivering his speech at the aaunches of free SHS Education at West Africa Secondary School in Accra.

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No, you can’t do it!

A Time With The Inspired Pen

There is something frighteningly fascinating about facing your worst fears. Come to think of it, I was as hyperactive as the proverbial rabbit on the eve of the appointed day. My stubborn eyelids would not shut! My yen to start the activities of the next day knew no bounds. “Ah! Not I, perhaps it’s the banku I gobbled up last night.” That was me, sleep talking, or so I was told, on the night before our very first meeting with the cadavers (dead human bodies).


Written By John Bravo - Right there in the exams hall, amid the fears and anxiety of several students, I sat glued to my seat, darting eyeballs to and fro, desperately seeking for a chance to unzip my shorts, and unleash the piece of paper I had hidden under my pants. Then with a quick, shuddery blink my eyes came flashing back wetly and wistfully at the invigilator, Miss Baffoe-Bonnie, hoping that she turns her gaze from my trembling body. Slowly the frigidity of the room died away; and despite being under two swiveling fans, I felt a sea of anxiety deep down, and a bucket full of sweat dripping down slowly into my boxer shorts. Like flames of fire in the chest, my body parts knew no rest. Teeth were clenched, fingers flexed; my eyes, all red.

Fate, surely, must have been at loggerheads with me on that sunshiny day. I had succeeded in smuggling the solutions of a French-essay Exam to the exams hall, in spite of a rather strict and thorough search by the invigilators. The difficulty and novelty of the illicit task ahead had already drowned me in the pool of jitters. With a faith as little as a grain of mustard seed, I hoped fervently that, at least, Miss Baffoe-Bonnie would excuse herself from the hall for a minute, so that I could copy the solutions from my ‘apor’. Much to my chagrin, fate seemed to wear a strange, hostile look on that day; my hopes of having the chance to transfer the answers from the illegal ‘weapon’ grew darker and darker.

Within the next couple of minutes, I heard a sound from behind me; a sharp sound of Miss Bonnie’s moving chair against the ground, being dragged nowhere other than toward my seat.  At this dark and scary moment, my soul had almost fled from beneath my skin. I was tongue-tied. My heart throbbed ceaselessly under intense fear. The heat energy I harbored under my skin was considerable- it could have burst open a clinical thermometer. Was she going to catch me red handed in a shameful act I had never done before? Were my mates going to sling the mud at me for trying to swindle my way through the exams? Was I going to be sent packing from a school I had recently been enrolled in? I wondered!

 Before one could even say Jack Robinson, I had my butts clenched -the obvious hideout of the apor-hoping to save myself from the wretched humiliation that was yet to unfold in my life. “Hey! Are you already done with the paper?” Miss Bonnie asked, as she plopped her body unto her armless chair barely an inch from my seat. A bit of a scare shot through me- a touch of uncomfortable suspicion. “Yes. Ma’am,” I stuttered, “I’m just adding finishing touches to my essay.” Her face beaming with a hearty smile, she gave me a thumbs –up, oblivious of the fact that I had not even written a thing on the answer sheets.  She then made headway to the next person on the row. The immediate next student happened to be the girl who had had the first-hand tip-off to the essay question. Knowing about my plight and weakness in the subject, the kind-hearted girl had offered to show me a book, the specific page even, in which I derived my answers. From the look of things, my Good Samaritan was no newbie to this act. I could tell from the boldness with which she spread her “apor” on her thighs, as she copied word for word, letter for letter, unto her answer sheets. She had probably done it a myriad of times and so there was no room for any fear or anxiety. By the time the invigilator got closer to the girl’s desk, which lasted not longer than I expected, she had already accomplished her mission and hidden it far from sight. Smart. Very smart. Impressively smart. On the other hand, I had no prior experience in this act; and my fear was that, my reputation would be derailed if I got caught in the shameful act.

As I struggled harder to scribble something on the paper, I felt a sudden, pensive regret for leaving my previous school. You see, it’s not as though I wasn’t performing in the other subjects. I always scored enviable marks in the other subjects; except for the French Language in which my scores were nothing to write home about. And it was mainly due to this: The subject was new to me. I had never studied French in my entire life until I enrolled at that particular school. The most interesting aspect of it all was that, we were in our second year - just a few months away from the final examinations (B.E.C.E) - and I was required to sit for the French paper as well as the others. Hmm… If you were in my shoes then, what would you have done - write the final exams with a French-empty head, stop schooling right away, or go back to primary one to learn the basics?

Sitting there helplessly and under a gloomy state of mind, all that I heard was, “A minute more to stop work!” Ei! I could not believe my ears. My brain rebelled against what I was hearing. I could not face the reality of the failure that stared me mockingly in the face. Truth be told, I had not written a single word on the sheets. I searched long and wide, North to South Pole, East and West, throughout my brain for something, just anything French to pen down. Every failed attempt dragged me much closer and closer to the final bell. Fortunately for me, few seconds to the final bell, my brain pulled up a surprise. Hold on, don’t jump to conclusions yet. All that my brain could offer was only the first word in the apor– Samedi. (Are you laughing?) It will interest you to know that, beside my full name and the day’s date, I wrote just “Samedi” on the answer sheets, as my answer to an essay question that required a word count of not less than 180 words. Yes, Samedi! Just Samedi - it means Saturday.

Hiding my face from the invigilator, I submitted my work within the split of a second, and then fumed out of the examination hall, heading straight to the house. I locked myself up in my room throughout the evening of that day. Tears scurried continuously from my eyes as I reflected on what had happened earlier on. The night was growing old; I was still in the crying mode, but my fate remained untold. Sleep eluded my body; my own bed rejected me. I had just one important decision to make – either to give up on the French Language or start learning the basics afresh.

 After what seemed like the most difficult decision ever made in my life, I walked boldly to Abena, my then eight-year old niece, who was then in primary three, and asked her if she could be my home teacher in the French Language. The young girl could not understand the possibility of my request. “How can a primary-three girl teach her high school uncle French?” She probably quizzed her mind. It was a puzzling irony for her eight-year-old mind to comprehend. I explained to her the urgency of my request and later she agreed to help me with the basics.

Every evening, right after dinner, it was an interesting scene to behold at the balcony, as my eight-year-old niece took me through her primary one, two and three French books. She would stare at me with an austere face, point me to a page in her book, saying,” Uncle. Make sure you don’t forget this… I will ask you again first thing in the morning.” It was a great and an unbelievable experience for everyone who stopped to steal a glance at us. She was that good; she could easily put herself in the shoes of her French teacher and deliver just as expected.

Days went by and my proficiency in the French Language intensified. It was like a dream to everyone; my mates marveled at the unrivaled contributions I gave during the French lessons. I was ever determined to get better at that subject - I would run to the library, lay hands on any basic French book I see; and when I didn’t understand anything, I sent it to my French teacher, Mr. Nuru, for explanation. He grew to love my zeal and zest for his subject.

 Some months later, I was called to represent my school in the annual French language competition organized by CREF (Centre Regional pour l’Enseignment du Francais) for schools in the whole country. Under the cameras of GTV and in front of the French ambassador to Ghana and other dignitaries; to the glory of God, I was declared the student with the highest score in the competition, and was sent back to my school with the Gold Prize. Amidst the thunderous rounds of applause from the audience full of students, tears streamed down my cheeks as I delivered my acceptance speech. To date, many think that, that was where I got my name ‘Bravo’ from.

Now; my friends, this story happened more than five years ago, but I was only reminded of it recently when one middle-aged man I know, had his business collapse entirely after spending all his youth building it.

You see, it’s hard when life puts you in a situation where you need to start all over again: It’s hard when you’ve worked all your years on a job and suddenly your boss sacks you from work. It’s hard when you’ve spent over ten years with a man, and suddenly he calls out for a divorce unexpectedly. It’s hard when you apply to a University and your application isn’t even considered. It’s just disappointing to go through the vicissitudes of life, only to be brought back to the starting line. But hear me out friends; giving up is too easy for you. You were built for something greater than that. Choose the best way out - start all over again.

Hello lovely reader, an ordinary pen has markedly been inspired, so get inspired! When life snatches everything from your hands, please start from scratch.

Email address: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

You can join the Writer on Facebook: The Inspired Pen, Twitter: @theinspiredpen and Instagram: theinspiredpen8

A curious crowd of parents, and residents gather in front of Kumasi Academy in the wake of the recent H1N1 virus outbreak. Photo credit: citifmonline

Thoughts From Afar

In his book The Once and Future King, T.H. White opined, “The best thing for being sad," replied Merlin, beginning to puff and blow, "is to learn something. That's the only thing that never fails. You may grow old and trembling in your anatomies, you may lie awake at night listening to the disorder of your veins, you may miss your only love, and you may see the world about you devastated by evil lunatics, or know your honour trampled in the sewers of baser minds. There is only one thing for it then — to learn. Learn why the world wags and what wags it. That is the only thing which the mind can never exhaust, never alienate, never be tortured by, never fear or distrust, and never dream of regretting. Learning is the only thing for you. Look what a lot of things there are to learn.”

The Ghanaian Quagmire: Ranting Change Whilst Preferring The Status Quo

Thoughts From Afar

 Rob Siltanen in a passionate rant blurted, “Here's to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They're not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can't do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.”

In My Own Words; Unpacking The Mystique

Thoughts From Afar

"They have no gods. They work magic and think they are gods themselves. But they are not. And when they die, they become dust and bone, and their ghosts whine on the wind a little while till the wind blows them away. They do not have immortal souls." Ursula K. Le Guin, in ‘The Tombs of Atuan’.

The Central Medical Stores fire debacle and investigation; two years on and counting….

Thoughts From Afar

I listened to the Minister of Health this morning on the current position of government regarding the Central Medical Store (CMS) arson. I must first start by acknowledging the tenacity he has demonstrated in getting this far. Having said that, I want to put certain information into prospective.

Ranting away; simple truths about chronic diseases and middle age. Photo credit - istock

Thoughts From Afar

Pema Chödrön in The Places that Scare You states, “A further sign of health is that we don't become undone by fear and trembling, but we take it as a message that it's time to stop struggling and look directly at what's threatening us.”

A CHARGE TO KEEP; REVOLUTIONISING THE DELIVERY OF PHARMACEUTICAL CARE. Image - Linkedin

Thoughts From Afar

Susan Elizabeth Phillips in Breathing Room argues, “I finally figured out that not every crisis can be managed. As much as we want to keep ourselves safe, we can't protect ourselves from everything. If we want to embrace life, we also have to embrace chaos.”